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 History of Milwaukee Biographies

Nearly 4000 biographical sketches of pioneers and citizens
The Western Historical Company, Chicago
A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881
Milwaukee County Wisconsin Genealogy

Biographies

 

JOHN BAAS

John Baas, formean of plumber's work department, was born November 2, 1854, in Milwaukee County. He commenced learning his trade with Hoffman & Billings when 15 years of age, and has been in their employ since. He has been in his present position since 1873. Mr. Baas' first wife died September 20, 1879, leaving no children. He was married again October 13, 1880, to Susan Baden, of Milwaukee.

Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881, pg. 1295

 

REV. JOHN BADING

Pastor of the Evangelical Lutheran St. John's Church of the Unaltered Augustburg Confession, was born November 24, 1824, in Rixdorf, near Berlin, Prussia. His classical and theological education was in the Mission Seminary in Berlin, and Hermannsburg, Hanover. He was sent to this country by the Evangelical Society of Langenberg, Barmen and Elberfeld. He was ordained October 6, 1853; came to the United States in July, 1853, and was pastor sixteen months at Calumet, and then five and a half years in Theresa, Dodge County, Wis. From 1860 to October, 1868, he was pastor at Watertown, and, since that date, has been in his present charge. He was married January 22, 1854, to Miss Dorothea Ehlers. of Brooklyn, N.Y. They have nine children, three of whom died in childhood six are living in Milwaukee; the eldest, John P., is a physician in this city; Dorothea is wife of E. Notz, Professor in the Evangelical Lutheran Seminary in Milwaukee; Mathilda, William, Ida and Gerhard are at home. Rev. Mr. Bading, in 1860, was elected President of the Synod of Wisconsin and other States, and was re-elected in 1862. In 1863, he has been President of his Synod. He is a Director of the German Society in Milwaukee for aid of immigrants. He is President of the Board of Trustees of the Northwestern University of Watertown, and also of the Theological Seminary at Milwaukee. As President, he is general visitor of all the churches in the Synod. He is a vigorous worker, a competent official and a beloved pastor.

Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881

 

JOHN P. BADING, M.D.

Chestnut street, corner of Third, was born in the Town of Theresa, Dodge County, Wis., in 1855, and received his earlier education in Germany, being sent there for that purpose. Returning to this country, he graduated from the Northwestern University of Watertown, in 1875, prior to which he had entered the Chicago Medical College, so that his three years' studies had been completed there in 1877, and was enabled to take his degree. He practiced at Lowell, Dodge County, Wis., for one year and then took up his residence in Milwaukee, when he is now engaged in his professional labors. The doctor is a member of the State Medical Society, of the Rock River and Milwaukee Medical societies, and has been Secretary and Treasurer of the Rock River Medical Society for two years. He is also one of the Assistant Health Officers of this city.

Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881

 

GEORGE BAILEY

Weighman in the puddle-mill, was born in Shrop, England, in 1856. At the age of 14, he commenced work in a grocery store in his native place, where he remained for five years. He was then in Birmingham two years in same business, also in Woverhampton two years, in Worcester six months, and six months in Shewsbury; came to American in 1879, and has been in his present position since that time.

Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881, pg. 1625

 

PETER BALTES

PETER BALTES, mason, residence No. 1402 Fond du Lac avenue, was born November 3, 1835, in Prussia, came with his parents to Milwaukee in 1842. He with his father worked on a farm for Dr. Chase about three years, and about one year at Auston's farm. Then they removed to the city. He was a brick mason a short time, then worked in the soap factory of Ludington & King about four years; next followed the lathing business several years, and for the past thirty years has followed the mason trade. His main work is setting boilers, gas retorts, ovens, etc; is a member of the German Methodist Society No. 1, Sons of Hermann, No. 14. His father died in 1872, aged sixty-four years. Mr. Baltes was married December 25, 1857, to Mary Bonger. She was born in Prussia. They have five children, three sons and two daughters. pg. 1508

OLDENBURG & BALTES Furniture Company, manufacturers and wholesale dealers in furniture, Nos. 873 and 887 North Water street; business established January 1, 1878, by Messrs. Oldenburg & Baltes. It was changed to a stock company, the present members being Charles Oldenburg, George Baltes and Rudolph Nunnemacher. They occupy a large five-story brick structure, 50x120 feet, and employ on an average 150 men. The machinery is run by an engine of 100-horse power; parlor suites form the specialty of their manufacture. When the company first commenced, they employed but twenty-five men and did about $25,000 business per annum. They now reach $120,000 per annum. This is one of the prominent, rising industries in the city.

CHARLES OLDENBURG is a native of Germany, born in 1849. He came to America in 1869, and stopped one and a half years in Chicago, coming to Milwaukee in 1871. He is the practiced man of the firm, having learned his trade in Germany. He was married in Milwaukee, September 16, 187?, to Miss Caroline Heiden. They have five children living. They are members of the German M.E. Church.

SMITH & BALTES furniture manufactures, Nos. 636, 638 and 640 North Water street. This business was first established in March, 1878, under the firm name of Oldenburg & Baltes. Mr. Baltes having withdrawn from the firm of Oldenburg & Baltes, carried on this establishment alone, until February 1, 1881, when H.N. Smith was admitted as a partner. The building is a large frame structure, 60x120 feet, three stories, run by a 40-horse power engine. From seventy-five to one hundred men are employed. The business ranges from $45,000 to $50,000 per annum.

GEORGE BALTES, was born in Prussia, November 28, 1839. He came to America with his parents when but two years of age, landing in New York July 4, 1842, and coming directly to Milwaukee the same month. His father George Baltes, died in Milwaukee in 1874, aged 62. Mr. Baltes was married to Miss Augusta Pollow, a native of Prussia, in July, 1861. They have seven children-three sons and four daughters. They are members of the M.E. Church.

H.N. SMITH, of the firm of Smith & Baltes, was born March, 20, 1820, in Royalton, Vermont; was engaged in merchandising in Bethel, Vermont, from 1841 to 1847, when he came to Sheboygan, Wis; was engaged in business in Sheboygan County until 1874, when he was appointed Warden of Wisconsin State Prison, located in Waupun; in 1877, was re-appointed, serving until January 1, 1880, when his second term expired; came to Milwaukee in January, 1880, and in February, 1881, became a member of the firm as above. Mr. Smith was a member of the Wisconsin Legislature in 1850, and of the Senate in 1853 and 1854.

 

EDWARD BARBER

Agent and dealer in real estate, is a native of England. He came first to Milwaukee in 1847, and became connected with the Milwaukee & Mississippi Railroad; was the pioneer agent to represent that road at Prairie du Chien. He was connected with that road for ten years, and afterwards was Secretary of Wisconsin Central Railroad, now called the Pacific Air Line Railroad, from Chicago north to Duluth, being successfully engaged in manufacturing matches for eight years. During that time he paid taxes to the Government of $1,000,000. After he sold out he engaged in real estate, and, since then, has conducted that business.

Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881, pg. 1114

 

JAMES BARKER

Auditor and General Passenger AGent of the Wisconsin Central Railway, is a native of New England, and was born in Massachusetts. He came West to Michigan in 1854, and entered the State University, at Ann Arbor, where he completed his education. He began railroading, in 1868, with the Des Moines Valley Railroad, and was connected with that line for ten years. In 1878, he accepted the appointment of Auditor and General Passenger Agent of the Wisconsin Central Railroad, and since then has occupied that position.

Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881, pg. 1095

 

JUSTUS P. BARKER

Quartermaster sergeant at the Soldier's Home, born in Poultney, Rutland County, Vermont. He is a son of J.B. Barker and Peace A. Brougham, both natives of Poultney. His great grandfather was Adjutant-General of Connecticut during the Revolutionary War. The subject of this sketch was educated and graduated at Troy Conference, Academy Vermont. He enlisted October 15, 1863 in Company I, Fifth Vermont Volunteer Infantry, which belonged to the Vermont Brigade Sixth A.C. He participated in all the battles of the regiment and served until May 5, 1864, when he was wounded at the battles of the Wilderness and sent to the General Hospital at Burlington, Vermont. After recovery he was detailed as clerk in the office of the Surgeon-General of Vermont. He came to Milwaukee in 1867, since which time he has been engaged in commercial pursuits until he accepted his present position at the Home.

Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881, pg. 1645

 

JOHN D. BARTEL

Boots and shoes, No 163 Reed street, was born in New York City in 1841. When four months old, he came with his parents to Milwaukee. When a boy he was employed in the book store of Perry & Hull, on East Water street; continued with this firm until they were burned out in 1854. In about 1855 he commenced to learn the boot and shoe trade with Bradley & Metcalf; continued with this firm till 1863, when he enlisted in Company B, Sixteenth Wisconsin Infantry.; served to the end of the war, and received an honorable discharge. He then returned to Milwaukee, and soon after opened a boot and shoe store. From a small beginning he has worked to a large and prosperous business. His store is now the largest in this line of trade on the South Side. Mr. Bartel married Amelia Haneg in 1865. She was born in Prussia. Mr. Bartel is a member of the Knights of Pythias.

Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881, pg. 1451

 

CHARLES R. BARTLETT

CHARLES R. BARTLETT, conductor, was born in Wisconsin in 1853. In 1871 he commenced railroading, as brakeman on the Chicago & Northwestern Railway, continuing with that company five years. He then left them to engage on the West Wisconsin Railway, in the same capacity; was on that line only a few months when he changed to the Milwaukee, Lake Shore & Western Railroad. In June 1879, he was promoted to conductor. At this writing, April, 1881, he has made his home in Manitowoc. Has now been in the company's employ five years. Has never met with an accident of importance.

See also Milwaukee, Lake Shore & Western Railroad in the Transportation/Railroad section
Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881, pg. 1398-1402

 

EDWIN W. BARTLETT

WISCONSIN EYE AND EAR INFIRMARY.
EDWIN W. BARTLETT, M.D., No. 422 Jefferson street, is a native of Vermont; was born in Jericho, Chittenden County, Vt., in 1839; received in early youth the advantages in the way of schooling which that State generally confers on all who are born within its borders; and in 1861 became a student in the University of Vermont, from the medical department of which he graduated with the degree of M.D. in 1866, having attended lectures in the meantime at the College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York. The doctor was assistant Physician and Surgeon of King's County Hospital, Flatbush, N.Y., from the Spring of 1866 until September of the following year, which he concluded that his professional usefulness would be enhanced by a visit to Europe, and the next two years were spent by him in the great medical schools, colleges and hospitals of Paris, Vienna and London. The advantages that have accrued to the public and to himself from that term of study will be readily comprehended. When Dr. Bartlett returned to the United States in 1869, he almost immediately looked towards the West as the theater for his labors. Coming to this State early in 1870, he settled in this city in the May of that year and entered at once upon a successful career as a medical man. After three years almost incessant application the doctor found a change necessary for the maintenance of his vigor, and he returned to his former haunts, the European schools of medicine, during the year 1874, spending most of his time in Vienna and Berlin. After his return to Milwaukee the doctor was impressed with the want of an institution adequate to the proper care and treatment of patients particularly those afflicted with diseases of the eye and ear and the handsome building in which the Wisconsin Eye and Ear Infirmary is located was erected, at an expense of $20,000, in 1877. The hospital is furnished with bath-rooms and heated on the most approved principles by furnace and stoves, the requirements of perfect ventilation being specially healed by the enterprising and liberal-minded director. The structure is calculated to accommodate forty patients without crowding, and very frequently the limits of its power are reached. In all large cities, and in many small ones, there are sufferers, whose name in legion, who are unable to pay for professional treatment, and with a hope that human agony might be alleviated by such means, a charitable department had been opened in the Wisconsin Eye and Ear Infirmary, which is sustained by voluntary contributions, the founder giving his skill and kind attention without charge in necessitous cases. He is a member of the medical society of this county, city and State, and also of the American Ophthalmological and Otological societies. The doctor was married tin 1874 to Miss Helen F. Ball of Milwaukee.

Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881, pg. 1030

 

JOHN K. BARTLETT

JOHN K. BARTLETT, M.D. residence on Cass street, northwest corner of Pleasant, was among the earliest medical practitioners of Milwaukee. He was born in Portsmouth, N.H., in 1816, and in 1834 entered Yale College. Completing his literary course in 1838, and graduating from the Medical Department in January, 1841, Dr. Bartlett emigrated to Milwaukee in the following month. Other men of like energy abandoned their professional pursuits in this sparsely settled region, but he never turned aside. He is now the only survivor of a little band who first came together to establish an organization of the medical fraternity in Milwaukee. A record of his efforst will be found elsewhere. He has been a member of the American Medical Association for about twenty-five years, was Vice President of the same in 1872, one of the Vice Presidents of the International Medical Congress in 1876, and President of the State Medical Society of the same year.

Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881, pg. 1014

 

BAUER BROTHERS

No. 760 Wind Lake avenue, foot of Fourth avenue, practical well sinkers and manufacturers of the celebrated Eagle wood pumps, dealers in all kinds of iron pumps and agricultural implements, wood and iron pumps repaired on short notice, also general agents for the celebrated "Pierce Well Excavator" and improved artesian well drilling, and mineral prospecting machinery; business established in 1877. They are both young men, active and enterprising and sons of Henry Bauer, who came to Milwaukee in 1849--Jacob Bauer, born in 1854, Peter Bauer born in 1856.

Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881. pg. 1515

 

JOHN C. BAUER

dealer in wood and coal, at No. 745 North Water street, came in Milwaukee in 1855, and clerked for his brother for seven years. He then started in the grocery business for himsel, which he carreid on for twelve years, when he sold out and commenced in his persent line of trade. He established business at his present location in 1875.

Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881

 

FREDERICK BENDER

Patrolman at the South Side Station. Has served on the force one year. He was born in Hamburg, on the Rhine, in 1840, where he engaged in farming. He came to America in 1857, and located in the State of Massachusetts, where he learned the shoemaker trade. He came to Milwaukee in 1872, and followed his trade until becoming a member of the force. He enlisted in May, 1861, in the First Massachusetts Infantry, and remained with the regiment during its term of service. Hew as honorably discharged at the expiration of his term of enlistment. He was wounded at the first battle of Bull Run. Mr. Bender was married in 1862, while home on furlough, to Miss Josephine Meyers, of Massachusetts. They have five children living.

Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881, pg. 342

 

WM. BERGENTHAL

President of the Wm. Bergenthal Distilling Company, was born in Westphalia Germany, in 1844. He came to this city in 1867. In 1869, he commenced the distilling business under the firm name of Bergenthal & Brother, in which he has since been engaged. He was married in 1874, to Miss Anna M. Grau. They have one son Victor. Mr. Bergenthal has always been an energetic, successful business man.

Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881, pg 1475.

 

HENRY BERGES

Henry Berges, proprietor of grocery at No. 592 Seventh Street, born in Hanover, Germany, February 7, 1845. he came to Milwaukee in 1867, and opened a store, where he has since remained. He was married to Mrs. Stark in 1868, also born in Hanover. They have five children, Jennie, Willie, Cassia, Elgie and Harry.

Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881, pg. 1196

 

JOSEPH BERGES

Joseph Berges, present Sergeant of the West Side Police, is a native of Prussia; emigrated to America in 1839; came to Wisconsin in 1842, and settled in this city in 1859. Served sixteen months in the United States army during the late war; has been a member of the police force thirteen years. In 1853 he married Mary Chapman, a native of Ohio, by whom he has had one child, now married.

Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881, pg. 341

 

PETER J. BERNINGER

was a native of Bavaria, and came ot America in 1853, locating in Louisville, Kentucky. In 1855 he came to Milwaukee, and purchased what is now known as Beringers's Garden, in 1862. He was married to Miss Frederica Shirmer, a native of Germany, in 1859, by whom he had three sons and three daughters. Mr. Berninger was a hard working, industrious man, self-made, and by his own efforts accumulated a large property. Mrs. Berninger lives at her residence on Pierce street, and rents the Garden property. The children all live in Wisconsin. Mrs. Berninger is a member of the German Trinity Church, of Milwaukee.

Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881, pg. 1850

 

LEVI H. BETTINGER

saloon and boarding-house, No. 775 Pierce street, is a native of Prussia, born in 1823. July 4, 1840, he came to America, and remained four years in New York State, coming to Milwaukee in 1844. He was foreman for Geo. Burnham eighteen years, and drove team ten years; was in the brick business twenty-eight years in all. IN 1850 he was married to Miss Angelina Brachman, a native of Prussia. They have three sons and four daughters. The family are all members of the Roman Catholic Church.

Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881, pg. 1488

 

BIERSACH & NIEDERMEYER

are the proprietors of the Galvanized Iron Works, Nos. 107 and 109 Oneida street. The business was established in 1874, by the present proprietors, on Market Square. In 1875 they removed to their present location. They manufacture, from galvanized iron, cornices, dormer windows, window caps, and all other ornamental work for buildings; also, beer coolers, Hays' patent fire-proof sky-lights, Austin's expanding water conductors, and everything else that can be fashioned from the material they work. They are masters of the trade, Mr. Biersach having learned it before coming to America. They have done some of the finest architectural work in the city. The cornices of Immanuel Church are from their factory. They are now filling a $20,000 contract for the roofing, cornices and turret caps for the new Exposition building now being erected. They are constantly increasing their business, entering into large contracts, which are faithfully carried out in accordance with the designs furnished by architects,m however elaborate they may be. It is comparatively a new industry, and the work from this and other like establishments is rapidly superseding the more ponderous and expensive stone and masonry work that was formerly in vogue.

Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881, pg. 1296

 

STEPHEN BIRD

keeper in the furnace, was born in Staffordshire, Eng., in 1829; went into a blast furnace when eight years of age, and has followed the business ever since; came to America in 1855; worked in the Leigh Valley, Pa., fourteen years. He then worked two years in Chicago for the North Chicago Rolling Mills Company; came to Milwaukee in 1871, since which time he has been in his present situation.

Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881

 

JOHN BIRK

proprietor of meat market, stalls Nos. 46 and 47 East Side market, is a native of Germany. He came to America in 1850, settling first in New York In 1854 he came to this city and a year later opened his present business.

Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881, pg. 1231

 

CHAS. A. BITTNER

proprietor of meat market and stock dealer, No. 456 Sixth street, is a native of the Town of Milwaukee. His father came here from Germany in 1845. He first commenced work as a clerk in a grocery store, where he remained one Winter, and then went to White Water, Michigan. He commenced the live stock business in 1868, and is at present doing a prosperous trade.

History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881, pg. 1231

 

ISAAC BLACK

Flour Inspector, was born in the north of Ireland, in 1824; came over to Canada in 1843, and learned the baker's trade in Montreal, and carried on the business there for twenty-three years; came to Milwaukee in August, 1864, and the following month, September 13, was appointed flour inspector. Since then, for the past sixteen years, he has held this position. He has twice resigned, but his resignation was not accepted. He has had a large, practical experience, anndre are few persons as well qualified to fill this important postion.

Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881

 

LIEUTENANT GEORGE M. BLEYER

Was born in Milwaukee April 26, 1840. At an early age he engaged in the printing business, beginning as a carrier boy, and working his way upward by pure merit to an editorship. At the outbreak of the Rebellion he resigned his position of the Evening Wisconsin, and enlisted as a private in Company A, First Regiment, which served three months in southern Pennsylvania and northern Virginia, engaging in the preliminary skirmishes of the great Rebellion. AT the conclusion of his three months term of service, young Bleyer re-enlisted for three years, and was made Third Sergeant of Company A. His ready conception of the needs and requirements of soldier life, togehter with a tender solicitude for the comfort of the men of his command, made him a general favorite. In September, 1862, while the First Regiment was at the seat of war in Kentucky, young Bleyer was commissioned Second Lieutenant of Company B, Twenty-fourth Regiment. He left the First, accompanied by the mingled regrets and congratulations of his comrades, expecting to enjoy a brief furlough before entering the field with his new command. He unexpectedly met the Twenty-fourth at Jeffersonville, Ind., and, his sense of duty to overrule his desire to see home and friends, turned about and went to the front, from whence he was destined never to return. He was badly wounded in the knee by a shell, at the battle of Stone River, on the 30th of SEptember, 1863, while acting Captain of Company F, and was removed to a cabin, which fell into the hands of Confederates when the Federal forces retired. Lieutenant Bleyer lingered in the solitary field hospital until the 25th of January, 1863-almost a month-when he gave up his young life as an offering to the cause he espoused with burning enthusiasm. During his army life Lieuntenant Bleyer furnished the Milwaukee press with graphic pictures of army movements and battles, over the signature of "Marion." He was also possessed by unusual talent as a poet, and his verses were readily printed by EAstern magazines. He was constantly noting his poetic thoughts, and many vagrant couplets, quartrains and humorous verses if proerly arranged and printed. HIs age at the time of his sad death was 22 years, 8 months and 29 days. His remains were brought to MIlwaukee and interred, with military honors, at Forest Home Cemetery.

Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881, pg. 803

 

BLUDAU & TERRELL

Manufacturers, of gentlemens', ladies' and misses' fine sewed boots and shoes, No 159 Wisconsin street, commenced business in the Fall of 1880.

Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881, pg. 1451

CHARLES M. BLUDAU
senior member of the firm, was born January 7, 1859, in Milwaukee, a son of Mathias and Margaret Bludau, who came to Milwaukee from Germany in 1850. Mr. Bludau was married, December 26, 1880, to Miss Kittie Garity, of Oshkosh, Wis.

Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881, pg. 1451

JOSEPH H. TERRELL, of this firm, is a native of Indiana, born November 3, 1856; learned the trade in Bloomington, Ill. where he was raised; came to Milwaukee in April, 1876, and worked for B.F. De Land, at No. 330 Grand Avenue, for two and a half years. He was married in this city in August, 1879, to Miss Marie Meiler.

Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881, pg. 1451

 

GUSTAV BODE

Professor of Analytical Chemistry, of No. 11 Grand avenue in this city, was born in Cassel, Germany, in 1834, and received his early literary training in the Gymnasium of that city, until he was 14 years old, when he was apprenticed to the drug trade for four years, and subsequently passed his examination before the Board of Pharmacy at Cassel in 1852. He remained as prescription clerk eighteen months in the establishment in which he had served his apprenticeship, and then commenced the study of analytical chemistry in the universities of Heidelberg and Goettingen, remaining three years so engaged, graduating at Goettingen in 1856. for the next year and a half he filled a Government appointment at an agricultural station in Prussia, and during that time determined to emigrate. In November, 1858, he came to this country sailing from Hamburg, and located in Cincinnati, Ohio, where he was employed as a druggist and manufacturing chemist by Gordon & Bros, for three years. In October, 1861, he came to Milwaukee and entered the drug store of Mr. Tesch. On January 1874, the partnership was terminated, Mr. Tesch retaining the drug stock and Professor Bode the laboratory and photographic supplies, with which he opened his establishment near by. Professor Bode has been called upon for and has given analyses of the medicinal waters of Waukesha, Oconomowoc, Madison, and of various other places in the Northwest, and was appointed Analytical Chemist for three years of the GEological Survey of Wisconsin by the State Geologist; being, also, very often called upon as an analyst in criminal prosecutions in the State, giving the fullest satisfaction by his exhaustive processes in every case, reflecting credit upon himself and on the profession.

Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881, pg. 1038

 

HENRY F. BODE, M.D.

corner of Walnut and Fifth streets, was born in Hanover, Germany, October 14, 1821. His literary course was completed in the Gymnasium at Goettingen, and he immediately entered upon the study of medicine in the Goettingen University, from which institution he graduated in 1847, practiced medicine nine years in Germany, and in 1857, determined to emigrate, and came to America, making his home and engaging in the practice of medicine in that year in Milwaukee, where he has since resided.

Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881, pg. 1026

 

VICTOR J. BODE

pharmacist and druggist, southeast corner of Fifth and Walnut streets, was born in this city, January 31, 1858, and received his educational advantages in the public schools of this city. In April, 1874, he began his apprenticeship to the drug trade with Otto A. Thiele, and served three years in preparing himself for the position since assumed by him in the profession. After the conclusion of his apprenticeship he went to Chicago and remained one year. Returned to Milwaukee, where he had concluded to open an establishment in his own name. Having passed an examination September 1, 1880, before the Board of Pharmacy, he started in business on the corner of Sherman and Third streets, and is now carrying on business on the southeast corner of Fifth and Walnut streets, on property owned by him.

Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881, pg. 1042

 

MICHAEL BODDEN

Was born February 16. 1826, at Lich, Circut Julich, Department Aix la Chapelle Rhine Provinz, Prussia. He received a common school education till 12 years of age, when, choosing the vocation of a teacher, he went through the course of study required by the Government College of Education. At the age of 18 he passed the required examination and was appointed as a teacher in one of the schools of the City of Cologna. He occupied that position over two years-till 1847.

At that time his father, Adam Bodden, a well-to-do farmer near Lich, having become tired of the oppression and misrule of some Government subordinates, which led to open revolution in 1848, decided to emigrate with his family to America. Michael, although of age, coinciding in the views of his father, decided to share the fortunes of the family and cast his lot with them in the great Republic beyond the sea. He accordingly resigned his position, and with his parents, a brother and a sister, took passage for New York from Antwerp, aboard the "Shakespeare," October 8, 1847, arrived in New York October 28 and in Milwaukee November 10.

The family settled first in the town of Wayne, Washington County, where they remained for three years then moved to Theresa, Dodge County, where the survivors still reside. The father died there ten years ago. The mother still survives. The sister, now Mrs. N. Koll, is a thrifty farmer's wife. The brother, Mr. Jacob Bodden, is also a farmer, and one of the leading citizens of that county. He represented his district in the State Assembly in 1861, 1866 and 1874. he has also served as Sheriff and Treasurer of the county and held many other offices of trust.

The subject of this sketch did not adopt farming as did the other members of his family, but after six months spent with the family at Wayne, began the practice of his chosen profession-a school teacher-in Germantown, Washington County, where he taught one year; then, in 1848, was called, as principal of St. Mary's School for Boys, to Milwaukee. He occupied this position and that of organist of St. Mary's church for nine years, winning during that time a high reputation as a teacher, through his efficient management of the large school, numbering as it did not less than 150 pupils. In 1858 he became assistant editor of the See Bote, a leading German daily newspaper, which position he retained for five years. He also served during this period, after 1859, as organist of St. Gall's church. In 1863, he was elected City Treasurer, and reelected in 1864. On his retirement from this office at the close of 1865, he first entered into the commission business with Martin C. Meyer, the firm name being Meyer & Bodden. The firm, established in 1865, has remained unchanged since its formation, and is still engaged in the same business as when started sixteen years ago. Although not among the oldest firms, it has outgrown its youth and ranks as one of the reliable receiving commission firms of the Chamber of Commerce.

Mr. Bodden has been a member of the Chamber of Commerce since 1865. He has since becoming a member served on the Board of Directors, Board of Appeals, and Board of Arbitration; also as first and second Vice President. He was elected President of the Chamber in 1879, and reelected in 1880. During the years of his presidency much important work has been accomplished, calculated to perpetuate the organization and give it a high standing among like institutions elsewhere. The most important works are: the finishing and occupancy of the new hall, the finest in the country, and the establishment of the gratuity fund for the benefit of deceased members, both of which owe much to his energetic and efficient labors during the administration.

Mr. Bodden married Miss Apollonia Ehlman, of Milwaukee, February 16, 1851. Their children are: Alois G., Amelia (now Mrs. F. Abler), Leo, Edmund, Apollonia, Rosa, Francis and Alphonso.

Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881, pg. 1152

 

ALBERT BOLKENIUS

gunsmith and dealer in guns, rifles, pistols and fishing tackle, was born in Rhine, Prussia, October 28, 1820. He grew up to manhood and learned the trade of gunsmith; emigrated to America in 1847, came to Milwaukee the following year and began working at his trade; since then he has continued in the business for one third of a century and is one of the oldest in the business here. In 1859, he married Miss Belle Simon, a native of Bohemia. Mr. Bolkenius is a prominent member of the Natural Historical Society and was chosen its first president.

Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881

 

C.D. BOOTH

retired, residence No. 127 Sixth street, born August 27, 1826. He came to Milwaukee in 1851 and engaged with his brother, S.M. Booth, as assistant editor of the Free Press Democrat, and in 1856 opened a hat and cap store on East Water street, which business he sold out in 1879. He was married in 1855 to Miss Sarah M. Bacon.

Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881, pg. 1602

Page 198 has an article about Milwaukee in 1850. The books states that the "following is from "Samuel Freeman's Guide", published in 1851....the newspapers now published in Milwaukee are as follows.....Wisconsin Free Democrat - Daily and weekly. Proprietor and editor, S.M. Booth."

 

FRANCIS J. BORCHARDT

attorney at law and Justice of the Peace; office No. 519 First avenue; born September 25, 1846. He came to Milwaukee in 1848 with his parents. His father, Joseph Borchardt, and his mother, each 65 years of age, are still living in Milwaukee. Mr. Borchardt is a graduate of St. Francis College in Milwaukee. He commenced the study of law with J.V.V. Platto in 1874 and was admitted to the Bar of the Circuit Court November 17, 1879; Feburary 3 he was admitted to the Supreme Court of Wisconsin. He was elected Justice of the Peace in April 1877, and has held the office since. June 27, 1862, he enlisted as a private in the First Wisconsin and served until the close of the War. He participated in the siege and surrender of Vicksburg, and in the Red River expedition under Banks and afterwards under H.J. Smith, who succeeded Banks. He returned to Milwaukee July 2, 1865. He is now Captain of the Kosciusko Guards of Milwaukee; was elected to that position three years ago. This company ranks sixth in the State.

Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881, pg. 660

 

JOSEPH BORKENHAGEN

Proprietor of the "Sharp Corner" Hotel, near the Forest Home. He was born in Germany, in 1828. When 23 years of age he enlisted in the Fourth Regular Army, under King William I, and served four years. He came to America in 1865, and located near the city on a farm, where he remained until he engaged in his present business. He was married in Germany, in 1854.

Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881, pg. 1490

 

AUGUST BORN

proprietor of meat market at No. 678 Ninth street, a native of Prussia, born April 5, 1857. He came to Racine, Wisconsin, with his brothers, in 1867. he has always been engaged in this business. In 1869 he came to Milwaukee and three years later went to Nebraska and Dakota, where he was engaged in each of those States in cattle herding, returning to Milwaukee in 1874; again opened a market and, in 1876, went to Texas, where he remained a year and eight months, returning to Milwaukee brining with him a Mexican pony, to which he is very much attached. He was married June 30, 1879, to Miss Julia Fahey, a native of Racine. They have a daughter Mary D. Mr. Born kills 120 head of beeves per month, besides other small stock.

History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881, pg. 1231

 

ANDREW BORNGESSER

ANDREW BORNGESSER, proprietor of meat market at No, 421 Milwaukee street, dealer in beef, tongues, hams, poultry, fresh fish, and oysters. Mr. Borngesser was born in Germany. He came to America and to Milwaukee in 1857, and has since been engaged in business in this city.

Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881, pg. 1231

 

H.G. BOSSE

boots and shoes, No. 1123 Chestnut street. Born in Brunswick, Germany; in 1849 he came with his parents to Milwaukee. His father died soon after coming here. His mother married again and settled in Washington County. He followed farming till 1860, when he returned to Milwaukee; worked at this trade till 1863. He then went to Chicago where he remained till 1871, when he again returned to Milwaukee and worked here at this trade till 1878, when he commenced his present business. He married Susan Eggert in 1869. She was born in Washington County, Wisconsin. They have three children.

Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881, pg. 1451

 

A. BOYSEN

commission merchant, corner of West Water and Reed streets, is a native of North Schleswig, Germany, formerly Denmark, and was born January 20, 1847. He received his education there, came to America in 1874, and two years later, in 1876, to Milwaukee; engaged in grain, commission and elevator business. In 1878 mr. Boysen was connected with the Danish Consulate in this city, and in the Spring of 1880, was appointed Danish Counsul. Since then has occupied that position.

In 1874, Mr. Boysen was united in marriage to Miss Selma Koch, a native of Denmark. They have two children-Asmus and Louie.

Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881, pg. 1161

 

JOSEPH BRANDT

junior member of the firm of Straw, Ellsworth & Brandt, was born in Cologne, Germany. He came to Waukesha County, Wis. with his parents when an infant. He came to Milwaukee in the Fall of 1865, and engaged with Stein & Mendel as porter. He worked his way up from porter to traveling salesman and traveled as such until April 1877, when he became one of their competitors. He was married to Miss Clara Dyke in December, 1877. She is a daughter of P.O. Dyke. They have one daughter.

Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881, pg. 1262

 

HENRY BRANDT

Harness, saddles, etc., at No. 340 Grove street. Mr. Brandt was born February 13, 1850, in Bruehl, Mecklenburg, GErmany, and went to learn his trade at the age of 14. He came to Milwaukee in 1868, and established his business in 1872, in which year he was married to Miss Hulda Fettback, who was born in Prussia. They have two children, Earnest and Louis.

Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881, pg. 1262

 

A.C. BRAZEE

A. C. BRAZEE, attorney at law, office Martin's Iron Block; was born in Wauwatosa, Milwaukee County, Wis., in 1875. When i5 years of age he went to Omro, Wis., with his parents. He attended Ripon College two years, studied law in the office of E. P. Finch, Oshkosh; was admitted to the Bar in the Circuit Court at Oshkosh under Judge Pulling April, 1878, and in January. 1879, to the Supreme Court at Madison under Chief Justice Ryan. He was a resident of Oshkosh from 1876 to the Spring of 1879, when he went to Superior, Neb., where he practiced his profession about one and a half years. He then came to Milwaukee in September, 188o, and opened a law office in Martin's Iron Block.

Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881, pg. 1658

 

BENSON BRAZEE

BENSON BRAZEE, was born at Hillsdale, Columbia County, New York, February 10, 1811, where he lived with his parents until the death of his father, Cornelius Brazee, in 1818, after which he went to live with David Collins, a fanner who resided there, but who soon after removed to Fayetteville, Onondaga County. New York. Mr. Bruce remained with him until he had attained his majority, having been educated in the common schools of the day. After leaving Collins, he worked for neighboring farmers, husbanding his scant earnings, until the Summer of 1835, when having heard of the opportunities of the Territory of Wisconsin, he determined to come West, which he soon did, and after a tedious journey landed in Racine the 1st of September in that year. He remained there a short time, and then came to Milwaukee. He invested his few hundred dollars in land indifferent portions of what is now Milwaukee County, finally clearing and breaking up a fine farm near Wauwatosa, for a homestead, and where he resided until 1870. January 28, 1844, he was married to Miss Althea F. Neal, adaughter of Captain John Neal, who was an officer in the War of 1812, and a native of Hudson. Columbia County, New York. They have three sons living, A. L. Brace, who-was a volunteer in the Forty-eighth Wisconsin Infantry, Company E, under M. V. B. Hutchinson; he served one year and is now a farmer in southern Kansas. George E., a stock dealer of the same State, and A. C. Brazee, who studied law with Finch & Barber of Oshkosh, Wisconsin, and was admitted to the Bar in the Spring of 1878, and who later came to Milwaukee where he is at present engaged in practice.

In 1870, Mr. Brazee sold his farm and removed to Omro, Winnebago County, Wisconsin, where he resided until the death of his wife, in April 1880, after which he returned to Milwaukee, where he at present resides, leading a retired life. Mr. Brazee has always been strictly temperate, and has from early manhood been, as was his wife, a member of the Wauwatosa Congregational Church; his contributions to religious and benevolent institutions have been liberal. Although at as advanced age, he is at present in good health, and has promise of years yet to come.

Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881, pg. 1591

 

JOHN BREIDSTER

John Breidster, of the firm of Keihl & Breidster, No. 69 Division street, commission merchants, is a native of New York State, and was born near Utica, October 18, 1842; came West to this city when only eight years of age, and attended school here; worked in a mill four years, and engaged in the grocery business with A.J.W. Pierce; afterwards carried on the business himself; sold out and was with I.M. Davis and A.J.W. Pierce, in the commission trade. In September, 1879, he engaged in his present business, and they are building up a good trade. In 1863, he married Miss Susan Cook, of Fond du Lac, Wis. They have six children: Mary A., John F., Charles J., Fred W., George E., and Ida Mary.

Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881, pg. 1193

 

AUGUST BREHMER

proprietor of meat market at 493 First avenue, was born in Prussia; came to Milwaukee in 1855, and started in business soon after.

History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881, pg. 1231

 

E. BRIELMAIER

E. BRIELMAIER, architect, sculptor, and builder, Nos. 192 to 200 Sherman street. He is a native of Germany, born in 1841. He came to America with his parents in 185o, locating in Ohio ; learned his trade in Cincinnati, and came to Milwaukee in 1873, when he established his present business, In 186o he married, Miss Theresa Haag, of Cincinnati. They have four sons and four daughters. Mr. Brielmaier makes a specialty of all church work. He first commenced with one man, and his business has gradually increased so that he does sculptor work in wood and decorating for the Eastern and Western States. He employs from thirteen to fifteen men.

Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881, pg. 1508

 

A.F. BRIGGS

Contractor and builder, No. 599 Jackson street, is a native of Stark County, Ohio, born in 1830. He came to Wisconsin with his father, A.T. Briggs, in the Spring of 1837. In 1855 he was married to Miss Roxanna Wheeler, of Illinois. They have two sons and one daughter. He employs during the busy season about thirty men. As will be seen by above, Mr. Briggs is one of the old settlers, having come here when Milwaukee was in its infancy.

Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881, pg. 1529

 

LEONARD BROWN

LEONARD BROWN, retired farmer, Town of Wauwatosa, born in Granville, Washington County, New York, May 18, 1803. He is a son of Jonathan and Anna Douglas Brown, both natives of Rhode Island. Their ancestors had lived in America for several generations. The subject of this sketch spent his childhood at his birth place, and spent several years in teaching school and farming there. He was married in the same town, March 3, 1831, to Amelia F. Everts. They have two sons and two daughters. He came to this county in April, 1836, and settled on a farm in Granville, on land which was an appropriation obtained of the Government by Byron Kilbourn, for the purpose of building a canal from Milwaukee to the Rock River. His two sons are still living upon the same land. He was the first Supervisor of the Town of Granville.

Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881, pg. 1642

 

DAVID BROWNWELL

Locomotive engineer at the yards of the North Chicago Rolling Mills, was born in Waukesha County, Wisconsin, in 1849; entered the service of Milwaukee & Prairie du Chien Railway, in 1864, as brakeman. IN 1867, changed to fireman, and was made engineer in 1871, continued with this company till 1870, when he left the road, and engaged with the Milwaukee Iron Company. IN 1871, was made engineer, and continued in the service of this company till the works changed hands, in 1877; has since worked under the new company. Resides on Superior street in Bay View.

Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881 pg. 1625

 

LOUIS BRUCKNER

boots and shoes, NO. 59 West Water street, was born in Hesse-Darmstadt, Germany. In 1854, he came to New York City, and worked in the navy yard at Brooklyn during the war. In 1865 he came to Milwaukee; commenced his present business in 1875; is a member of St. Peter's Society; married Margaret Lauffer in 1858; she was born in Rhine-Bavaria; they have three sons and one daughter.

Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881, pg. 1451

 

EDWARD BRUNK

Groceries and provisions, flour, feed, etc., No 672 Second avenue; born in 1849 in Prussia. In 1857, he came to Milwaukee, where he has since lived. He commenced, at the age of 14 years, to learn the millwright trade, which he still follows. In 1874 he established his business. Mr. Brunk married Amelia Splett in 1868. She was born in Prussia. They have six children, four sons and two daughters." Page 389 is part of an article about the "Present Condition of the (Fire) Department". It states, " EDWARD RIEMER, Captain of Hook and Ladder Company No. 1, is a native of Germany, and was born January 8, 1847. His parents came to this city in 1852, and he grew up and attended school in Milwaukee. He entered the Volunteer Fire Department as torch boy of Hook and Ladder No. 2 in 1861, and remained with that company until June, 1867. He entered the Steam Fire Department August 1, 1871, as Pipeman of Engine Company No. 4, and was transferred to Supply Hose No. 1, serving until December 1, 1873, and was then transferred to Truck No. 1. He was promoted to be Foreman February 1, 1876, and since then has held that position. He was united in marriage to Miss Catharine Liech, a native of Milwaukee, Oct 13, 1867. They have five children, Mollie, Fred, Eddie, Nick and Emma.

Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881, pg. 1196

 

S.C. BRUSSAT

boots and shoes, No. 605 Greenbush street. Born in Prussia March 28, 1841; in 1868 he came to Milwaukee and worked for Bradley & Metcalf till 1875, when he started business at this number. He owns those premises. Married Henrietta Kampin in 1868; she was born in Prussia. They have six children, five sons and one daughter.

Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881, pg. 1451

 

C. BRUSSOK

No 558 National avenue, boots and shoes. Born February 20, 1833, near Breslau, Prussia; at about the age of fourteen he commenced to learn this trade which he has since followed. In 1861 he came to Milwaukee. Two years later he commenced his present business; had served three years in the Germany army. He married Anna Niroda in 1859. She was born in Prussia. They have nine children, six sons and three daughter.

Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881, pg. 1451

 

CHARLES J.L. BUETOW

Of the firm of Buetow & Schraeger, merchant tailors and drapers, No. 423 East Water street, is a native of Wisconsin and was born in Milwaukee May 3, 1848. He lived and received his education in this city. After reaching manhood, he engaged in business, and in 1873 associated with Schraeger, his present partner, and since then they have carried on the business here and have built up a good trade.

Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881, pg. 1252

HENRY SCHRAEGER

of the firm of Buetow & Schraeger, merchant tailors and drapers, No. 423 East Water street, is a native of Germany, born August 6, 1838. He came to America in 1858, and lived in New York and Philadelphia. In 1868 he came to Milwaukee and for some years was with Zimmermann & C. In 1873 he formed a copartnership with Mr. Buelow, at the store as before stated. In 1870, Mr. Schraeger was united in marriage to Miss Matilda Ihling, a native of Michigan. They have four children, Emma, Nativia, Otto, Annela. Mr. Schraeger is a member of the Germania Musical and Literary Society.

Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881, pg. 1252

 

HERMAN BURBACH

proprietor of meat market at No. 1528 Walnut street, was born in Villmer Prussia, May 11, 1852. He came to Milwaukee in 1856, and in 1876 established his present business.

Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881, pg. 1231

 

M.L. BURDICK

M.L. Burdick, farmer, residence section 21, was born in Jefferson County, N.Y., in 1813; moved to Chautauqua County, remaining there six years; he then went to Dayton, Ohio, where he spent two years, and removed to Chicago in 1833, traveling afoot, and alone. While there, he helped build the first frame house in that city. The building was situated at the corner of Dearborn and South Water streets. The following year, in 1834, he came to Milwaukee, and helped build the first frame house here, situated near where the old La Crosse Railway depot used to stand. In the house, his father and family made their home. During the Winter of 1834-35, the little settlement at Milwaukee would have suffered for provisions, had it not been for the enterprise of Captain Pickering, of the little schooner :Illinois," which happened to touch at this point late in the Fall, after the river had frozen over, and people were getting anxious over the shortness of supplies. Captain Pickering volunteered to try and make the run to Cleveland and back, and get the greatly needed provisions. The voyage was made, and on the vessel's return, she was run aground off the mouth of the old river. The settlers turned out with a will, and by the aid of the old scow and a line, the provisions were safely landed, and the little hamlet made happy. Mr. Burdick then made a claim of the site of his present farm (1834). At that time there was no house in the township. The Government surveys not having been made, he had to guess at his, at the description of his claim. He returned to Ohio in 1837, and was married on the 14th of September, to Miss Olive S. Patterson, daughter of Eratus and Zuruah (Simmons) Patterson. Mrs. Burdick was born in Potsdam, St. Lawrence County, N.Y. Immediately after their marriage, they moved to the Town of Lake, and settled on Mr. Burdick's claim, which is now a well improved farm, where they have made their home for forty-four years. Mr. Burdick's first crop consisted of 1,100 bushels of potatoes, which sold readily at $1 per bushel. The first wheat he had floured, was taken to Geneva Lake. The trip was made with an ox-team and took nine days to accomplish it. Mr. and Mrs. Burdick had nine children. The oldest, George was married to Candace O. Wood. Martha V., now Mrs. Capt. H.C. Fulton, of Lake. Helen M. died in infancy. Ellen P., now Mrs. George P. Nelson, chief engineer of the North Chicago Rolling Mills Company, at Iron Mountain, Illinois. Fred Morgan was accidently killed in the construction of the rolling mills at Bay View, November 15, 1869. Frank L. died April 21, 1865. William W., of Iron Mountain, was married to Julia A. McCredie. Melvin L. is living on the farm. Mr. Burdick made a trip to California in 1852.

Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881, pg. 1649

 

J.W. BUSSEY

J.W. Bussey & Co., house, sign and banner painter and decorators, NO. 269 Broadway; also dealer in wall paper, window shades, etc.

J.W. BUSSEY is a native of Schleswig-Holstein, Germany, born in 1843. He came to New YOrk in 1851, and to Rochester, N.Y., in 1854, where he remained two years and then came to Milwaukee. He learned his trade here and completed it with T.P. Collingbourne. He established his present business in 1863 by buying out Galloway & Co. In 1874 he took his brother into the business with him as partner, and they have since continued together.Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881, pg. 1536

 

F.S. BUTTLES

tin and galvanized iron jobbing shop, No. 110 Clybourn street. Mr. Buttles is a native Pennsylvanian, born January 1, 1831. He came to Milwaukee with his parents in 1844, learned his trade with his brother, Cephas A., and continued with him until the brother went out of business in 1876, when he established a business for himself, and has conducted it successfully until now; employing four hands, and increasing the number as the season demands.

Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881


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